Measuring the effectiveness of parks

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This topic contains 3 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  drew hanson 7 years, 4 months ago.

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  • #493

    This question cuts across several topics: what are the key ingredients for a successful national park? Adequate funding? Supportive friends group? Capable management? All of these are important, but are there any critical factors that a park ‘must have’ in order for it to be effective?

    #575

    Well educated, highly dedicated, skilled staff with positive leadership.  I honestly think if we can retain that we can weather the storms, inovate for the future, and care for our parks and visitors.

    #1304

    Laura
    Member

    The ideals of what the National Park Service is and why we were created seem to be continually pushed to the bottom of our development and management templates.  Going back to the basics of preserve and protect the things that are unique and special might put the NPS back to a navigable course.  We are diverging in directions that have nothing to do with what our purpose is, what our enabling legislation intended, and lacking communication of who we are.  Once those things are remembered there is no question on what we should be spending our money, time, and staffing on.

    #1306

    drew hanson
    Member

    Effectiveness is >measured< by evaluating quantifiable goals or yard sticks or things that are measurable. What are the things NPS can use to quantify the effectiveness of each area that receives NPS funding? I’ll toss out five possible Measures of Effectiveness that come to mind: “difference between requested annual budget versus budget received”, “annual number of donated volunteer hours”, “annual number of volunteers”, “annual number of times the NPS area was covered in the news media” and “annual number of tweets mentioning the NPS area”. (I don’t use twitter but there are interesting studies that quantify tweets by subject.) What are others?

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